Travel Tip 3: Pave the Way for Safe, Healthy Travels

Travel Tip 3: Pave the Way for Safe, Healthy Travels

Most parts of the country can be safely visited by tourists, provided they take basic common-sense precautions e.g. not walking alone in deserted areas at night, not flashing photographic equipment or jewellery and, in traffic, maintaining a safe following distance. Most major cities run organized crime prevention programmes and Basic Safety Tip guidelines are available at hotels and tourism information offices. If you are in doubt as to the safety of a particular area or attraction, contact the National Tourism Information and Safety Line on 083 123 2345. This number may also be used for assistance in replacing lost documents or reporting incidents.

Mpumalanga_Mac Mac Falls

Malaria is found only in the Lowveld of Mpumalanga (incl. the Kruger National Park), Limpopo (north-eastern areas and near the Zimbabwean and Mozambican borders) and on the Maputaland coast of KwaZulu-Natal (north-east as far south as the Tugela River). Malaria risk is highest October-May. Although the incidence of malaria is rare, it would be best to take adequate precautions if you choose to visit these areas. In addition to malaria prophylaxis, insect repellents and mosquito nets can be effective. Check with your doctor or a travel clinic before you leave to make sure you get proper medical advice. South Africa has a large network of hospitals offer excellent service, but make sure you have adequate health insurance.

Traditional Village in Mpumalanga
South Africa’s tap water is potable and of the safest and cleanest in the world. In hotels, restaurants and nightspots, the standards of hygiene and food preparation are generally top-notch. It is safe to eat fresh fruit and salads and to put as much ice as you like in your drinks — a good thing, too, after a day on the beach or in the bush. Tap water undergoes treatment which ensures it is free of harmful micro-organisms and contaminants. In some areas, South African drinking water is rich in minerals, and may involve a bit of getting used to. Avoid, however, drinking water from streams and rivers, especially in areas where there is human habitation. These may carry water-borne diseases. But if you encounter an unpolluted mountain steam, a drink should be most refreshing.

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